More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Go down

default More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by up7587 on Sun Mar 15, 2020 7:43 pm

up7587
up7587
Draft Pick
Draft Pick

Number of posts : 4728
Age : 66
Location : Portland
Registration date : 2007-04-30

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by up7587 on Wed Mar 18, 2020 9:50 am

up7587
up7587
Draft Pick
Draft Pick

Number of posts : 4728
Age : 66
Location : Portland
Registration date : 2007-04-30

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by FloridaPilot on Wed Mar 18, 2020 12:04 pm

up7587 wrote:Finally, some racing action:
https://twitter.com/i/status/1239196410857340933

I'm a close follower of Scottish soccer ("come for the football, stay for the entertainment"), and this entire Reddit page dedicated to Scottish soccer has become a hotbed of marble racing discussion over the last few days. It started as a joke, but it is legitimately all that anyone is discussing on there anymore. You can follow Jelle's Marble Runs (link below) on YouTube for more videos that are pretty well put-together and funny. I've chosen the teams Raspberry Racers and Green Ducks to support. Laughing

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYJdpnjuSWVOLgGT9fIzL0g

FloridaPilot
First man off the Bench
First man off the Bench

Number of posts : 671
Location : Sunshine State
Registration date : 2015-03-12

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by up7587 on Wed Mar 18, 2020 12:30 pm

That was funny and well done.

It just occurred to me! Premier League Darts is cancelled. What will we do?!
up7587
up7587
Draft Pick
Draft Pick

Number of posts : 4728
Age : 66
Location : Portland
Registration date : 2007-04-30

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by up7587 on Sat Mar 21, 2020 10:12 pm

Times are getting desperate. FS1 is broadcasting an eNascar race Sunday. Many drivers use a race simulator, iRacing, as preparation for real races. Similar to how pilots and astronauts use simulators. So they're going to broadcast a simulation race now.
https://www.nascar.com/news-media/2020/03/21/world-of-enascar-kligerman-posocco-preview-iracing-pro-invitational-series/
up7587
up7587
Draft Pick
Draft Pick

Number of posts : 4728
Age : 66
Location : Portland
Registration date : 2007-04-30

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by Geezaldinho on Thu Apr 16, 2020 4:57 pm

It is starting to get real.

Cincinnati has dropped men’s soccer, Old Dominion has dropped wrestling, and the P5 conferences are petitioning the ncaa for a waiver on the requirement they each sponsor 18 sports.

The NCAA itself lost 80% of this year’s revenue when they cancelled March Madness, so it is unlikely conferences like the WCC will see anything this year.

Lost in this, of course was the results of an ncaa study that showed only 26 football programs make a profit.

The quickest way for ncaa programs to remain solvent is to drop down a division in football or drop the sport.

I’m pretty sure men’s soccer wasn’t the cause of insolvency at Cincinnati.

We shall see if ncaa sports are for students or just big business.
Geezaldinho
Geezaldinho
Pilot Nation Legend
Pilot Nation Legend

Number of posts : 11016
Location : Hopefully, having a Malbec on the square in Cafayate, AR
Registration date : 2007-04-28

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by up7587 on Sun Apr 19, 2020 11:13 pm

Finally, some competitive action that isn't a rerun.

up7587
up7587
Draft Pick
Draft Pick

Number of posts : 4728
Age : 66
Location : Portland
Registration date : 2007-04-30

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by DoubleDipper on Mon Apr 20, 2020 12:03 am

Loved the commentary provided during the doggy competition, reminded me of the hours we spent watching sheep dog trials while living in the UK.

I think you'll find the popcorn competition in this SNL skit is quite intense!



You're going to have to watch this twice, once for the skit, and once using the pause feature to read the crawler at the bottom...
DoubleDipper
DoubleDipper
Pilot Nation Legend
Pilot Nation Legend

Number of posts : 8563
Location : Across the Bridge
Registration date : 2011-11-03

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by DoubleDipper on Tue Apr 21, 2020 4:21 pm

The recent protests against the nation's attempt to stem the sickness and death caused by COVID-19 reminded me of this:

More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus Charle10

Those words were written by Rev. Charles C. Miltner, President of the University of Portland, and appeared in the Beacon on December 12, 1941, just five days after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor.

DoubleDipper
DoubleDipper
Pilot Nation Legend
Pilot Nation Legend

Number of posts : 8563
Location : Across the Bridge
Registration date : 2011-11-03

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by aleppiek on Wed Apr 22, 2020 9:20 am

A bit chilling how fitting that statement is right now.
aleppiek
aleppiek
Starter
Starter

Number of posts : 793
Age : 38
Location : NoPo
Registration date : 2007-11-14

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by up7587 on Wed Apr 29, 2020 4:14 pm

GU has told their students that school will be in session for the Fall semester.
up7587
up7587
Draft Pick
Draft Pick

Number of posts : 4728
Age : 66
Location : Portland
Registration date : 2007-04-30

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by DoubleDipper on Wed Apr 29, 2020 4:48 pm

up7587 wrote:GU has told their students that school will be in session for the Fall semester.
So has UP, sort of, but it would seem that Summer Session II may be online...no definite word yet.

DoubleDipper
DoubleDipper
Pilot Nation Legend
Pilot Nation Legend

Number of posts : 8563
Location : Across the Bridge
Registration date : 2011-11-03

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by DoubleDipper on Sat May 02, 2020 10:31 am

With little else to write about, I am sharing an email I received from a pilot a month ago.  At one time he was my very young first officer (co-pilot) at a commercial airline, but now he's a captain and a Freight Dog! I hope it gives you some sense of what one segment of our supply industry is doing to keep it safe!
Tim wrote:I’ve never really considered myself to be an essential person. Of course, in the larger sense of  community, we’re all essential. But outside of my immediate family and my pets, no one has ever considered me essential. That was until a few weeks ago when the U.S. government did. I have been working for a large overnight package/freight carrier for the past 30 years and at that moment, I received a field promotion from Freight Dog to Essential Personnel in the war on the COVID-19 virus.

I’d been at home or traveling on vacation for much of the crisis’ early days but last week it was my turn to go to work. As you can imagine, I had my own set of worries about traveling to Europe in the midst of a pandemic and these concerns were reinforced when I saw pictures that my co-workers were sending from Germany. The town that has for some time served as my home away from home, where I had so many memorable evenings and some that people tell me were memorable but that for some strange reason I don’t remember, was on lockdown. This was weeks before anyplace in the US, and if you know anything about Germans, they take the rules very seriously. The streets were empty, and reports were that everything was closed.

The first segment of my trip was a deadhead seat on a passenger airline flight that would get me into position. We can make our own travel arrangements for this so I chose to take a train from my home in Philadelphia to Newark airport where I had a business-class ticket on United Airlines to Frankfurt. I’d been hanging around the house for a while by that point, maybe a bit removed from the world outside of our suburban village, and I was shocked to be dropped off at the main Philadelphia Amtrak station and to see nothing but desolation. I was a little early and there were seats, but was it safe to sit in them? There were two other people nearby but they had masks. Should I talk to them? I decided standing was probably my safest course and that I should maintain my distance. What our society used to consider a negative, being socially awkward, has turned into a positive with a shiny new name: social distancing. I had an assigned seat on the train, but it was so empty that I could have spent the next hour trying out every seat in every car. I didn’t.

At Newark, the ticket kiosk flagged me and wouldn’t issue a ticket. A day or so earlier, Germany had locked down its borders and no one without a German passport was allowed in. I explained my newly bestowed essential status and the human agent summoned her supervisor. I got a printed boarding pass. You could have easily rolled a bowling ball down the concourse and not hit a soul. All of the shops, restaurants, bars and premium lounges were closed. I found one of United’s Red-Carpet lounges open and spent two hours luxuriating with kid-sized packages of pretzels, carrots and cookies. Wine was free, but I was warned by other pilots that going through immigration at the other end might go smoother if I wore my uniform, so I stuck to diet Coke.

“Boarding group One may now board the plane.” The agent stopped me. Can’t board with a U.S. passport. I was directed to the service desk, confident they would bow to His Essentialness and let me pass. I showed my pilot credentials and work ID, but she wasn’t buying it. As this went on, I could hear, “group 2 may now board,” group 3 and so on. Group 7.  Would I miss my first trip in 30 years?

Finally, with everyone else on board, the agent asked me if I had a printed copy of my schedule to prove what I was saying. I did not and finally tried one last appeal to sanity.

“What can I possibly show you that I couldn’t have made up at home that would prove to you that I am going to Germany to operate air service between European cities? Is this something people regularly come to you with as a bluff to get on airplanes while holding an expensive ticket?” I saw gears turning in her mind and she threw her arms up and let me get on the plane. If there are any problems, they’ll take care of them at the other end.

As it turned out, our crews all over the U.S. were having the same issues as they tried to get into position. The first officer that I was paired with was coming from Dallas and his Dallas-to-Frankfurt flights kept getting canceled. Finally, American loaded him on a flight from Dallas to London where he would connect with a British Airways flight for the final leg to Frankfurt. No amount of talk could convince the British Airways agent of his essentialness and they refused to board him. He found his way across town and rode in on one of our company flights from Stansted airport. Everyone eventually made it over.

A nice flight and I slept through most of it. This was my first exposure to a grounded fleet. Lufthansa had grounded a large percentage of their fleet and most of them seemed to be out my window, lined up on every stretch of pavement at FRA. One taxiway seemed to be dedicated to the giant Airbus A380—all 14 of them wingtip to wingtip on the taxiway.

No real problem at the other end. The immigration officer was just puzzled about what I was doing there.
“So, you are flying a plane tonight?”
“Yes.”
“Back to the U.S?”
“No, around Europe.”
“Cargo?”
Our company likes to refer to our loads as “packages,” but this was no time for a grammar lesson. “Yes.”
“OK.” One more stamp in my loaded passport and I was in.

A quick stop in the airport supermarket for some supplies. Yes, the Frankfurt airport has a supermarket. I knew that there was a potential for food problems, and I figured I’d better get some while I can. I loaded up on ramen, dried sausages and anything else that could provide sustenance as well as some chocolate for the family back home. There is a stereotype that commercial pilots are pampered, and everything is taken care of for us before we waltz down a red carpet to our aircraft. I chuckled about the disparity between that and the reality of me stocking up on Cup of Noodles and German Slim Jims.

One more deserted train and I was there. The pictures that I had seen did not lie. The Germans can teach us a thing or two about quarantines. Looking both ways before crossing a street was not necessary. There were no cars. Occasionally you would reach an intersection with a traffic light and see a few other pedestrians. I laughed at how even with no cars as far as the eyes could see, they were obeying the German tradition of staying put until the light changed from Don’t Walk to Walk. It reminded me of Blazing Saddles where Slim Pickens sent one of his henchmen back to town for “a boatload of nickels” when they encountered a fake toll booth in the middle of the desert. In Germany, the rules are the rules.

I got to our hotel, which was closed except for our flight crews. At a given time there are about 80 or so of us there, and someone had convinced them to keep their doors open for us. That’s a scene that seems to be happening more and more around the world. I get alerts daily about hotel changes as hotels close and consolidate their guests.

There’s a restaurant in town that our guys tend to congregate at in better times and the owner had decided to stay open for us during very limited hours. You could walk the few blocks to her place but only in a group no larger than two people. A larger group ran the risk of incurring a 500 Euro fine. Takeout meal in hand you go back to the hotel and eat in your room. The first few people can eat in our crew lounge, but they are afraid if there are more than 5 of us in there at any time the authorities will close the hotel.

Hotel pickup at 3 a.m. for a flight to Warsaw. Cleanliness and disinfection of the airplanes had been an ongoing concern. Our cockpits get a deep clean once in a while, but I don’t think anyone really knows when as evidenced by some of the flotsam I have found between the rudder pedals. Typically, food, and typically round. Think oranges and hardboiled eggs. During these times, we are given assurances that the planes will be kept cleaner. Armed with our supplied N95 masks and bottles of hand sanitizer, we headed out to the airplane, a Boeing 767. They had run out of the “good” sanitizer and were issuing little bottles of a homemade solution of watered-down bleach. I’d have to say that stuff may kill germs in an emergency, but it is not for regular use. Madge, the Palmolive lady, would not approve. After using that stuff my hands looked reptilian.

There was a notice on the captain’s control wheel that the airplane had been cleaned and disinfected with a name and a time stamp, but also the notice that they had not touched anything forward of the center pedestal which is the area we live in, or any of the flight instruments. On the center pedestal was a bottle of Clorox wipes inscribed with the tail number of that plane to make sure it didn’t grow feet and walk off. I have to question the efficacy of this. It’s very hard to get all the nooks and crannies on an instrument or switch panel. An aerosol or an ultraviolet light treatment would seem better, but what’s the saying, you go to war with the army you have, not the army you want.

Headwinds added a lot of time to our flight, but we got to Poland just as the sun was coming up. Not much traffic on the radio but at the hours we fly over there, that’s the norm. Landing at Chopin airport revealed the fleet of the Polish national airline, LOT, taking up most of the ramp space with their 98 aircraft. We were met in the cockpit by two masked Polish soldiers who had some health papers for us to fill out before they took our temperatures.

The normal early morning rush hour did not materialize, and we were dropped off at a largely abandoned high rise containing the Marriott hotel. The normally bustling lobby was empty and grimly dark. Eventually a staff person came to give us keys to our rooms and inform us that we had been given upgraded rooms. One advantage of flying during a global pandemic, you can get the good rooms normally held out for the best guests. I’d have 14 hours to spend in a two-story suite on the 40th floor.

There’s an old saying among freight dogs that “no matter what time it is when you takeoff, it’s breakfast when you land.” Crazy scene at the huge breakfast buffet. Quite a spread and at 7:30 a.m. but there was no one there to take advantage of it but the two of us, waited on by about six staff members. We sat by the large picture windows and watched empty commuter buses and trains pass by. They assured us that there were other guests in the hotel, but we never saw another person.

The evening flight back to Germany was made shorter by the headwinds that had hurt us on the way out, so much shorter that we landed about a half hour early, apparently a half hour before the ground personnel that meet the airplane show up for work. Short staffed during the local quarantine we sat in the plane for 25 minutes after everything was shut down waiting for a ride in. Again, I looked around for the pampered red-carpet treatment given to commercial pilots. I think it was last seen in 1986.

Let me say at this point that our treatment in Europe was quite different from the treatment of my coworkers in Asia, particularly those choosing (yes, it’s optional) to fly through China. Our normally nice hotels have been replaced in China with government-commandeered travelers hotels that have probably never seen a western guest. In other places we stay in hotels that are internal to the airport, transit hotels, where you don’t clear customs and theoretically don’t enter the country.

In a couple of places, Shenzhen and Dubai for example, they have instituted nasal swabbing tests which have been described as a footlong Q-tip inserted in your nasal passage until it reaches your brain. It’s brought grown men to tears and crews are now standing up to the treatment, refusing to take the test and being put on the next plane out of town, although reportedly they have been threatened with having their passports confiscated, visas canceled, and criminal action against them in China. We have crews flying in and out of China twice a day and they will be subjected to these tests each time, even if they are just passing through. You really have no assurance over the training of the person administering the test. I don’t blame people that just say no.

If you think this through, what will they do to you if you are found to be positive on one of these swabs? And let’s not forget that there is a certain amount of false positive results in the test. Are they likely to send you to a nice hotel to wait it out or to Peoples Medical Center number 12 with a busload of other infected and contagious people where you receive questionable medical care or at best not along the standards we are used to in our country?

Other crews have reported being commanded to stay in their rooms while hallway guards make sure that the rules are enforced. Three times a day there is a knock on the door, they open it and find a tray of food. No hotel gym, no walk around the property, enjoy your room. The situation changes daily, sometimes for better, sometimes for worse. The companies that are operating are continually adapting to the situation and making the best out of things.

Our flight home had another eye opener. Normally when we cross the Atlantic, there are flexible airways in the sky that are referred to as the North Atlantic Organized Track System (NAT-OTS) but we pretty much just refer to them as the tracks. They are adjusted twice a day to suit the swarm of aircraft that are typically all going in one direction to give them the most wind-efficient routing. It’s not uncommon to fly hundreds of miles out of your way to avoid a headwind or to catch a tailwind. In the evening, the tracks go from west to east, and in the morning and afternoon, the tracks flow from east to west capturing most of the North Atlantic traffic.

On a typical day, there are 2500 flights crossing the Atlantic on the track system. Each plane is separated, roughly 10 minutes in trail behind the plane in front of it, and 60 miles or one degree of latitude from the plane next to it. With improved GPS capability, those distances can be shrunk even further to accommodate more airplanes. Twenty-five-mile lateral separation will soon be the norm. You are vertically separated by 1000 feet, and this is for the altitudes from 30,000 to 41,000 feet. Tight margins but a lot of airspace to operate in.

We plot the tracks on a paper chart or on our iPads and it is not uncommon to have six or eight tracks active at a time to accommodate all of those planes with one reserved for opposite-direction traffic. On the night of our crossing, there was only one track in each direction, a direct reflection of the lack of traffic crossing the ocean with all of the airline groundings and travel restrictions in place. As I write this on March 31, I see only one track altogether. This is a very sad state but probably what we need to fight the pandemic.

So, I am now back at home, probably my first trip ever to Germany where there was no beer available, a testament to the gravity of the situation. I worry about two things. Did I bring a contagion home to my family and can I go back to work on my next trip with a certainty that I will not get sick over there? Initially, anyone traveling from overseas was asked to self-quarantine for 14 days. That was eliminated for transportation workers because I guess the virus recognizes the essential nature of our services.

I talked to a friend who is a pulmonologist dealing firsthand with these things and expressed my concerns as well as my desire for a test. He said that the virus is so prevalent worldwide now that your odds of catching it here are no less than your odds of catching it in Italy for example, one of the layovers on my next trip. We are all self-quarantined at this point so the 14 days for international travelers really doesn’t mean much. As for a test, no chance. There aren’t enough to go around in our area and if you are asymptomatic, you don’t qualify for one.

His advice was to wash my hands as often as possible, and to no matter what, avoid touching my face. He said I needed to keep an eye on co-workers, and we all needed to tell each other when we see someone scratching or touching. If you must scratch, his advice was to wash hands before and after. I have to say my face as never itched as much as it does now after hearing not to scratch. He asked me to pass this information along to everyone. So here it is.

So, I left home and hearth and took a trip to Europe. Did I really exercise an essential function in the big scheme of things, or did we just carry rubber dog doo from Hong Kong as Tom Cruise was warned about in Top Gun? Our company claims to carry 3 percent of the world’s GDP and 6 percent of our country’s at any one time. What would happen if we all stayed home?

I think as flight crews, we all accept that we have a little more risk traveling in these times and as flight crews carrying freight and not people, we constantly reflect on the fact that we have a steady paycheck and some level of security that our brothers and sisters in the passenger world do not. Much of the world will be in economic straits soon and long after this is all over. Keep us fed and watered, and we’ll perform. Were we to stay at home and the transportation systems collapsed, recovery and survival would be jeopardized that much more? I’d like to think that we did some good, carrying medical supplies and pharmaceuticals along with the rubber dog doo. Time will tell.
DoubleDipper
DoubleDipper
Pilot Nation Legend
Pilot Nation Legend

Number of posts : 8563
Location : Across the Bridge
Registration date : 2011-11-03

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by FloridaPilot on Tue May 12, 2020 4:24 pm

The Cal State system has already announced that it will be largely online for the fall semester. I see no way that they can field athletic teams in this circumstance. That likely means: temporary recruiting advantages, scheduling implications (especially for those conferences like the Big West that have Cal State campus members), and (most importantly) legal implications regarding the standard of care during this pandemic that other schools may be held against in a court of law.

https://www2.calstate.edu/csu-system/news/Pages/CSU-Chancellor-Timothy-P-Whites-Statement-on-Fall-2020-University-Operational-Plans.aspx

FloridaPilot
First man off the Bench
First man off the Bench

Number of posts : 671
Location : Sunshine State
Registration date : 2015-03-12

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by DoubleDipper on Thu May 14, 2020 8:58 am

Former UP Athletic Director, Larry Williams, now the U. of Akron Athletic Director, has declared the Zips will drop three sports programs due to the financial impact of COVID-19.

Akron Athletics wrote:AKRON, Ohio –  The University of Akron (UA) announced today that it will discontinue three intercollegiate athletics programs at the end of the 2019-20 academic year as part of its plan to reduce the University's financial support to the Athletics Department by approximately 23 percent ($4.4 million). The action is being taken as part of the University's overall redesign to emerge from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in a way that financially stabilizes the institution.

Affected by the decision are the sports of men's cross country, men's golf and women's tennis. With the change, UA, which previously sponsored 20 sports, will now have 17 sports (7 men's sports and 10 women's sports). Akron will remain a member of The Mid-American Conference (MAC).

https://gozips.com/news/2020/5/14/general-redesigning-the-univeristy-of-akron-athletics-update.aspx

Really, 23% of the financial support for the Athletics Department from those three sports? Glad to see they are not dropping football, baseball, and men's and women's basketball, but 23% went to 32 student-athletes?
DoubleDipper
DoubleDipper
Pilot Nation Legend
Pilot Nation Legend

Number of posts : 8563
Location : Across the Bridge
Registration date : 2011-11-03

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by Dean Murdoch on Thu May 14, 2020 10:27 am

I think dropping those three sports will just be part of the 23% reduction. I'd imagine Big Lare is making a few other (non-newsworthy) cost-cutting measures as well, maybe eliminating some staff positions or reducing overall team budgets or whatever.

Akron MBB has had 15 home games and 5 away games in non-conference the last two years. That could definitely add up in the budget if Akron's revenue is less than the guarantees they're paying out to these schools to come visit.
Dean Murdoch
Dean Murdoch
Starter
Starter

Number of posts : 990
Location : SK
Registration date : 2015-01-20

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by up7587 on Thu May 14, 2020 11:16 am

All about the scholarship elimination. Cross country, some shoes. Golf, some greens fees.Tennis, some yellow balls. Those sports cost almost nothing except scholarships.
up7587
up7587
Draft Pick
Draft Pick

Number of posts : 4728
Age : 66
Location : Portland
Registration date : 2007-04-30

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by DoubleDipper on Thu May 14, 2020 12:56 pm

up7587 wrote:All about  the scholarship elimination. Cross country, some shoes. Golf, some greens fees.Tennis, some yellow balls. Those sports cost almost nothing except scholarships.
But is it all about scholarship elimination?  scratch

This from a guy who knows a lot more about money and numbers than most:
up7587 wrote:...I always wonder, though, when you say "where the money would come from".  A scholarship is basically a waiver of tuition and fees, isn't it.  The money comes from the school and goes to the school, so it is not like they write a check to someone else.  Isn't it simply a reduction in income for the school?  The cost is perhaps an opportunity cost if the returning athlete takes up a spot that would otherwise go to a paying student.  The school would have out of pocket costs for the food plan and book, but the margin on those is pretty good I bet.  So however much in the red or black the school operates, some extra scholarships for returning seniors would be a little more in the red or a little less in the black.  Please correct me if my understanding of how scholarships work is wrong.
DoubleDipper
DoubleDipper
Pilot Nation Legend
Pilot Nation Legend

Number of posts : 8563
Location : Across the Bridge
Registration date : 2011-11-03

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by DoubleDipper on Thu May 14, 2020 1:03 pm

According to CollegeCalc, The total tuition and living expense budget for in-state Ohio residents to go to University of Akron Main Campus is $27,279 for the 2018/2019 academic year. Out-of-state students who don't have Ohio residence can expect a one year cost of $31,316.

Of that total cost/expense, less that $10,000 per year is for tuition...

If tuition is not really an expense for UA, then it would still cost a large chunk of change for room, board, and books for 32 student-athletes for four years....but it would still be less than $2 million total...not $4.4 million quoted in the story.

I'm way over my head here and out of my lane, but I still ask, 23% of the athletic budget for 32 students who need little more than uniforms, little white balls with dimples, and fuzzy yellow balls?

https://www.collegecalc.org/colleges/ohio/university-of-akron-main-campus/
DoubleDipper
DoubleDipper
Pilot Nation Legend
Pilot Nation Legend

Number of posts : 8563
Location : Across the Bridge
Registration date : 2011-11-03

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by DoubleDipper on Thu May 14, 2020 2:12 pm

Of course another big expense can be travel, something we've already addressed in the Women's Soccer forum when regionalizing the soccer schedules.

The Atlantic-10 is also condensing their schedule to cut down on travel...
NBC Sports wrote:The Atlantic 10 conference announced some minor changes to its 2020-21 sports calendar due to ongoing developments from the coronavirus.

Seven sports - field hockey, volleyball, men’s soccer, women’s soccer, baseball, softball and women’s lacrosse - will see their conference seasons regionalized and condensed by 25%. For volleyball, men’s soccer, women’s soccer, baseball, softball and women’s lacrosse, those conference championship fields will be reduced to four teams. Field hockey already had a four-team championship set.
No changes were announced for the men's and women's basketball seasons, which are the largest sports within the conference. The schedule pairings for those sports will be announced later this week and are expected to be heavily focused on regional matchups.
https://www.nbcsports.com/washington/ncaa/atlantic-10-condense-2020-21-schedule-seven-sports-minimize-travel-during-coronavirus
DoubleDipper
DoubleDipper
Pilot Nation Legend
Pilot Nation Legend

Number of posts : 8563
Location : Across the Bridge
Registration date : 2011-11-03

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by DoubleDipper on Thu May 14, 2020 5:03 pm

DoubleDipper wrote:I'm way over my head here and out of my lane, but I still ask, 23% of the athletic budget for 32 students who need little more than uniforms, little white balls with dimples, and fuzzy yellow balls?
I'm told that the year before Larry Williams took over as AD at Akron the school spent $7 million on its football program.  In his fourth season at the helm the school spent $12 million...now we know why he needed to cut 32 skinny student-athletes from the budget.  Rolling Eyes
DoubleDipper
DoubleDipper
Pilot Nation Legend
Pilot Nation Legend

Number of posts : 8563
Location : Across the Bridge
Registration date : 2011-11-03

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by up7587 on Thu May 14, 2020 5:48 pm

DoubleDipper wrote:
up7587 wrote:All about  the scholarship elimination. Cross country, some shoes. Golf, some greens fees.Tennis, some yellow balls. Those sports cost almost nothing except scholarships.
But is it all about scholarship elimination?  scratch

This from a guy who knows a lot more about money and numbers than most:
up7587 wrote:...I always wonder, though, when you say "where the money would come from".  A scholarship is basically a waiver of tuition and fees, isn't it.  The money comes from the school and goes to the school, so it is not like they write a check to someone else.  Isn't it simply a reduction in income for the school?  The cost is perhaps an opportunity cost if the returning athlete takes up a spot that would otherwise go to a paying student.  The school would have out of pocket costs for the food plan and book, but the margin on those is pretty good I bet.  So however much in the red or black the school operates, some extra scholarships for returning seniors would be a little more in the red or a little less in the black.  Please correct me if my understanding of how scholarships work is wrong.

Funny numbers. Balancing the books for allocated costs.

Of course, now there may not be the opportunity costs, as schools (like Akron and UP?) may loose a good percentage of their students. Hard to justify private school tuition for on-line courses. Maybe all the students will do schooling on-line, and the sporting events will be virtual video games. "My school's fake team beat your school's fake team, and we do things the right way."
up7587
up7587
Draft Pick
Draft Pick

Number of posts : 4728
Age : 66
Location : Portland
Registration date : 2007-04-30

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by FloridaPilot on Wed May 27, 2020 1:05 pm

A running, updating list of Division I teams cut during the pandemic: http://businessofcollegesports.com/tracker-college-sports-programs-cut-during-covid-19-pandemic/

I hesitated to post this in the "More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus" thread, because I believe the vast majority of these impacts are not due to the virus. Rather, the virus is a convenient scapegoat for these cuts that are likely due to deeper issues.

There will undoubtedly be more to come, but for now I take some comfort in noting that none of the schools listed thus far are ones that I would consider peer or aspirant institutions for UP. Furman, maybe, but I know their situation is very different than UP's.

FloridaPilot
First man off the Bench
First man off the Bench

Number of posts : 671
Location : Sunshine State
Registration date : 2015-03-12

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by FloridaPilot on Thu May 28, 2020 4:43 pm

Brown University claims this is unrelated to the COVID-19 budget slashing that is occurring at other schools, and that it is a matter of being more competitive within the Ivy League. But, I felt that it somewhat fit with this discussion already. That being said, they are dropping 11 varsity teams to club status and elevating two club teams to varsity.

Varsity to club: men's and women's fencing, men's and women's golf, women's skiing, men's and women's squash, women's equestrian and men's indoor and outdoor track and cross country.

Club to varsity: coed sailing and women's sailing.

https://www.espn.com/college-sports/story/_/id/29235883/brown-university-drops-11-varsity-sports-adds-2

FloridaPilot
First man off the Bench
First man off the Bench

Number of posts : 671
Location : Sunshine State
Registration date : 2015-03-12

Back to top Go down

default Re: More Effects of the COVID-19 Virus

Post by DoubleDipper on Thu May 28, 2020 6:32 pm

FloridaPilot wrote:Brown University claims this is unrelated to the COVID-19 budget slashing that is occurring at other schools, and that it is a matter of being more competitive within the Ivy League.
Hmm, I guess it's just a matter of putting more resources in fewer sports by cutting back on the resources to a higher number of sports. But you can see why they picked sailing... They're already doing fine!

Ripped from the headlines: Brown wins College Women’s Nationals! https://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/2019/05/24/brown-wins-college-womens-nationals/

It doesn't appear to be a money saving move because we know the Ivy League does not offer athletic scholarships, and the league recruits student-athletes based upon the prestige of them graduating from an Ivy League school, so I'm not sure it will have that much affect on the student-athletes themselves.

Although, I recently met one family that was so impressed, and wanted everyone else to be impressed, that their son was the stroke on the Harvard Crew...so I guess there's the prestige factor.   

I thought they were going to have a stroke when I asked, "oh, you mean the guy who rides in the back of the boat?" Razz
DoubleDipper
DoubleDipper
Pilot Nation Legend
Pilot Nation Legend

Number of posts : 8563
Location : Across the Bridge
Registration date : 2011-11-03

Back to top Go down

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum